Trucking

Helpful Information About Potential Trucking Jobs

  • semi in front of a truck stop

    The eyes and ears of our nation’s highways

    Human trafficking has been a hot topic in the news lately, but it’s been a persistent issue for centuries. Even with an unsettling 40 million victims of human trafficking, countless individuals are still blinded to the matter. Unfortunately, truck drivers see it occurring in plain sight. In hopes to build awareness of the ongoing problem with human trafficking, January was named National Human Trafficking Awareness Month. We encourage you to take a look at how you can participate this month.

    What is Human Trafficking?

    Human trafficking is the exploitation of human beings through force, fraud or coercion for the purpose of commercial sex or forced labor. The following information is from dosomething.org and Truckers Against Trafficking.
    • Globally, human trafficking brings in $150 billion a year for traffickers.
    • The National Human Trafficking Hotline received more calls from California than any other state followed by Texas and Florida.
    • 2,692 of those calls made to NHTH were by truck drivers.
    • About 50,000 people are trafficked into the US each year, most often from Mexico and the Philippines.
    • 1,296 human trafficking victims have been identified by the transportation industry.

    Truckers Against Trafficking

    Truck drivers have shown they are in business to save lives. Truckers Against Trafficking was established in 2009 to empower the trucking, bus and energy industries to take a public stand against human trafficking. Currently, 1,014,367 truck drivers have completed their Certified Trucker Against Trafficking program. Over the years, TAT has received recognition from the U.S. Congress and the United Nation’s 100 Best Practices list for their dedicated success. Plus, they have partnered with numerous motor carriers, trucking industry associations, government transportation agencies, truck stops, travel plazas and law enforcement.

    Hero of the Highway

    Millions of truck drivers have become the eyes and ears of our nation’s highways, like Kevin Kimmel. In 2015, Kimmel saved a woman from modern-day slavery. At the time, he was pulling into a truck stop to sleep, and saw a distraught young woman through the darkened window of an RV. He decided things didn’t look right and called local law enforcement. When the police arrived, they found the 20-year-old woman malnourished and frightened. The woman had been kidnapped two weeks prior, and because of Kimmel, she is free.

    Drivers Encouraged to Participate in #WearBlueDay

    National Human Trafficking Awareness Day is recognized on January 11. The Blue Campaign, a public awareness campaign created by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, hosts several events and educational activities. One of their largest initiatives is #WearBlueDay. To participate, take a photo of yourself dressed in blue and share your photo on social media with the hashtag #WearBlueDay. If you’re looking for other creative ways to raise awareness you can view their full list here or take a look at how other truck drivers have helped combat human trafficking.

    3 Ways Truck Drivers Can Make a Difference

    1. Get Certified. If you’ve received your CDL training, join Truckers Against Trafficking’s army of transportation professionals working to disrupt human trafficking. The Truckers Against Trafficking test is free for all truck drivers. You can get certified online or see if your organization offers training.
    2. Follow your instincts. Call or text the National Human Trafficking Hotline to report a tip if you ever believe you may have information about a trafficking situation.
    3. Don’t turn a blind eye. If you witness any suspicious activity notify the truck stop employee or call local law enforcement.

    If you are interested in becoming a hero of the highway, learn more about how to become a licensed CDL Truck Driver. America is depending on you!

  • Photo of Equal Pay For Women

    Life as a trucker is more and more favorable for women with the chance of equal pay!

    As the labor market tightens, many women are looking to infiltrate male-dominated industries in search of higher and equal pay. The American Trucking Association has reported a booming 234,234 female truck drivers, a 68% increase since 2010. Many are citing competitive pay as their motive for entrance into the industry. The workplace culture of the modern truck driver can be against the grain for many women.This is partly why the industry's employees are currently only 8% female. However, don't forget, that number has increased by 68% in the past 9 years. Noticing the discrepancy between the amount of male and female truckers, Ellen Voie began the Women In Trucking Association in 2007. She wanted to create a network of female truck drivers and to encourage a more diverse representation of women in the profession. While helping the general public better visualize female truck drivers, Voie hopes that other women will be encouraged to get licensed as well. The association continues to raise awareness of the specific issues, such as equal pay, to help bring more women to the industry. They also want to focus on the encouragement of more women in executive and managerial positions. If you are a woman, 0r know a woman, interested in getting started in the trucking industry, here are some facts you can share with them about the opportunities trucking provides:
    • Truckers' pay is determined by load, hours and mileage. Therefore, gender, ethnicity or age does not affect your earning potential.
    • The advancement opportunities for a truck driver are endless and all depend on your personal hard work.
    • With more women grasping at the opportunity for equal pay, we can predict a climbing rate of female employment nationally and is a small part of acting against female poverty in the United States.
    • In addition to pay opportunities, as a trucker, you will get the freedom to travel and see the beautiful country
      Does this sound like an opportunity that fits your interests? Do not wait any longer! Contact us for more information on how to achieve your goals.
  • A photo of CDL Refresher Course

    Refresh your trucking skills and get back on the road!

    Career changes and job advances happen to everyone no matter what industry you are in. Trucking is no different. Maybe the trucking industry is calling you back home. Even if you've been out of the trucking business for a while, we can help restart your career with a CDL Refresher Course. ACI can update your skills and make sure you are confident enough to get back behind the wheel.  Check out the reasons you should enroll in a CDL Refresher Course.

    Tailored to You

    Our CDL Refresher Course can be tailored to fit your individual needs. We understand that everyone may have different skill levels and therefore needs a specific course structure.
    • 3-week course: This behind-the-wheel only course is designed for students who already hold a California CDL permit, but have little to no experience behind the wheel of a commercial vehicle.
    • 2-week course:  For this course, CDL permitted drivers should have little to moderate driving experience before starting the course.
    • 1-week course:  Students who take this course have moderate to above moderate experience driving and a CDL permit.

    Short Time Commitment

    We know that you have already been through extensive training when you first obtained your CDL. Here at ACI, the purpose of our CDL Refresher Course is to help update your knowledge and experience behind the wheel. That is why our courses will be a maximum of 3 weeks to get you back on the road.

    Location Options

    The ACI CDL Refresher Course is available at all four of our locations: Visalia, Fresno, Merced, and Bakersfield campuses. Therefore, you can find an option that works best for you and your schedule.

    Feel Confident

    All of our CDL refresher courses are designed to help students feel prepared to take the behind-the-wheel CDL exam. There is no shame in asking for a little bit of help. ACI is here to fit your needs and help you fulfill or get back to your career goals. Contact us today to get back behind-the-wheel in a short amount of time.
  • CDL Training & Welding with ACI

    School is back in session for you too!

    It's back to school time for families across the country and it can be back to school for you too! There is no better time to hit the books again. While your kids are trying to move on to the next grade level, you will be moving on to your next career!  At Advanced Career Institute (ACI), you can take the first step to a new career in trucking or welding. Still not sure? Check out our list of great reasons to start your training today!
    • Short Training Time - At ACI, our goal is to get you trained and out in the workforce in a time frame that gets you earning the money you deserve quickly. If you go back to school with ACI, you'll be off to the workforce in 4 weeks for trucking and 38 weeks for welding.
    • Job Placement- Going back to school can be scary because of the uncertainty of career placement once you graduate. However, ACI takes care of this worry for you! ACI offers job placement assistance that includes helping your job search, practice for interviews, and spruce up your resume.
    • Jobs In Demand - Currently, the trucking industry is one of the most in-demand career paths on the market today. This means jobs are just around the corner for you once your training is complete. Additionally, as a new school year starts, opportunities for school bus drivers will also emerge.
    • Tuition Assitance Available - If you go back to school with ACI, you have the possibility to be eligible for financial aid assistance. This assistance can help pay for your training and possibly take away the stress of tuition for you and your family.
    • Inspire Your Children- Children look up to and admire their parents. If they see mom and dad are working hard in school, it can encourage your children to do their best in school too!  This can turn into wonderful bonding time.
    Back to school season is here! Enroll in a trucking or welding course and start on a path to a rewarding career. Giving yourself a great career can help to provide for your family so that they can succeed too. Contact us today to learn how to get started!
  • Know How Hours of Service Rules May Change Your Schedul

    The Department of Transportation (DOT) passed new Hours of Service (HOS) regulations that affect most big rig drivers on US roads. The goal of the rules is to make roadways safer by having better-rested truck drivers. As a truck driver, new or experienced, it is extremely important to understand how these regulations could affect your work schedule. It doesn't matter if you're OTR, short distance or interstate, all Class A drivers need to follow these new HOS rules!

    HOS Rules Breakdown

    • Your day of driving begins after 10 hours off.
    • You can drive 11 hours, then you must take a 10-hour break.
    • During your first 8 hours of work, you must take a 30-minute rest break.
    • Drivers must reset: they must spend 34 hours or more not driving, either after driving 60 hours in a 7 day week or 70 hours in an 8 day week.

    A Day with the new Schedule

    • 4:00 am, arrive to work, check your load, do your safety walk and drive.
    • 11:50 am, you've been driving for almost 8 hours. Take a 30-minute break.
    • 12:20 pm, you're back on the road for 3 more hours after a safety walk.
    • 3:20 pm, you've reached your 11-hour limit. You now need to take your 11-hour break. Sleep, eat, explore the city you are in, as long as you are not driving.
    • 1:20 am, you have your beauty sleep! Do your safety walk and get back on the road! You've got 8 hours until your 30-minute break.
    New electronic log devices (ELDs) are helpful to keep an eye on your 11-hour shift. They also reduce the ability to cheat on a logbook or do any other "creative recordkeeping". Again, the whole purpose of both the new HOS rules and the ELD rules is to ensure that truckers are well rested when they're on the road.

    Are you an Exception?

    As of August 2019, only livestock haulers and insect haulers are exempt from the HOS rules. Livestock needs to rest and drink, so a livestock hauler may need to go 12 or more hours straight to get to their destination, rather than leaving live animals on a trailer for 10 extra hours at a standstill. **Note that on of August 14, 2019 FMCSA has released some proposed changes to the new HOS rules, but they have not been implemented yet.** At Advanced Career Institute, we focus on training qualified CDL drivers who are employable and safe. Truck drivers are in high demand and these HOS rules are just becoming a part of the job! Contact us if you think the life of a trucker is for you!
  • Is Truck Driving More Than Meets The Eye?

    A truck driver's job is to drive, right? Obviously, driving the truck is the biggest responsibility, but it is certainly not where the job ends. As a truck driver you need to take on several additional responsibilities in order to be successful. Here are five of the most important duties that a truck driver has on top of driving:
    1. Know the rules:  As a truck driver you need to know and abide by the rules of being on the road. For example, your hours of service rules, traffic laws and how they may vary by state.
    2. Know proper procedures: You need to know unloading and loading procedures, how much weight your rig can handle, etc. What are the procedures if you get involved in an accident? Take time to understand these before hopping on the road.
    3. Know your equipment: You need to keep your equipment in good repair. While major repairs are handled by maintenance or a mechanic, truck drivers need to do basic, routine stuff like keeping the truck clean, inspection before and after any trip, checking your oil, etc. It's also your responsibility to note anything that needs to be repaired.
    4. Become a planner: You need to be a good planner. Choosing the best route is up to you and can greatly impact your success as a truck driver. It helps to be familiar with GPS and other route planning technology. However, be careful to not become overly reliant on it. Even in this day and age map reading is a useful skill. You will need to plan alternative routes to get around traffic congestion, accidents, or weather-related problems in order to get your goods to the client on time.
    5. Keep good records:  Although many modern trucks have black boxes that log certain things automatically, truck drivers need to be able to keep all of the required logs. You have to log break times, load and unload times, delivery instructions, etc. In many cases, it is the driver's responsibility to know what should be loaded onto the truck and make sure that the goods match what they are supposed to be.
    Being a truck driver does involve long hours behind the wheel, but there are other skills you need to develop as well. Without these skills, you may not find the quick path to success that you were hoping. Take pride in being a truck driver and with that, take the time to perfect your skills. To find out more about getting the best training to prepare for this demanding job, contact Advanced Career Institute today.
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