Trucking

Helpful Information About Potential Welding Careers & Trucking Jobs

  • proper steps for maintaining tires in the winter months

    How to Keep Proper Care of Tires During Winter Months

    In most parts of the country, winter brings with it snow, ice, slush, and sleet. All of which makes for hazardous driving conditions. Unfortunately, life just can't stop everytime mother nature spits out another inch (or more) of snow. So, you'll need a car that can handle the cold and all that comes with it. Your tires are your first line of defense for tackling the coldest of seasons; therefore, you'll want to maintain them to the best of your ability to avoid any dangerous or expensive situations. Here are 5 things you can do to keep your tires from spinning out of control this winter season.
    1. Make sure you have winter tires.

      If you know you'll be hit with ice and snow relentlessly and frequently, you'll be better off with tires made specifically for these conditions. These tires are equipped with tread patterns and rubber compounds that make them better suited for snowy conditions. They also make a good investment because solid winter tires should be able to serve you for several years. There is also a reduced risk of an accident, which will potentially save you hundreds of dollars in repairs.
    2. Check and maintain tire pressure.

      Did you know tires can actually lose pressure when temperatures begin to drop? For every 10 degrees the temperature drops, tires lose about 1 pound per square inch (or psi) of air pressure. For example, a tire at 32 psi in 70-degree weather will go down to 28 psi at 30 degrees. Deflated tires reduce fuel mileage, can wear your tires out, offer less traction, and can lead to irreversible damage. Most gas stations have air stations, and you can buy a gauge anywhere they sell vehicle parts. When in doubt, seek an expert.
    3. Check your tread depth for optimal performance. 

      Aside from pressure, you must also make sure your tread depth is adequate, especially for the winter. Usually, when your tires reach 2/32" (4/32" for steer tires), the U.S. Department of Transportation recommends (and some states legally require) you change your tires. But, in the winter, you may want to change them when you hit 5/32". Tires with more tread depth give you more traction and help reduce your chances of hydroplaning. You can measure your tread depth with the penny method, but make sure to use a quarter for winter conditions.
    4. Watch how you drive. 

      Your tires can only do so much to prevent sliding and hydroplaning; you have to do the rest. Leave a good distance between you and the car in front of you to give yourself good reaction. When in slick conditions, accelerate, brake, and steer as though you had a cup of hot coffee on the dashboard. Driving this way can help you against losing control of your vehicle when dealing with ice and snow.
    5. Get your tires checked by a mechanic you trust. 

      If you want to have extra confidence in your tires, ask your mechanic to take a look at them. He can check their pressure, tread depth, traction, etc. For a simple check, they usually shouldn't charge you anything, but if you don't have someone you trust, get a second and/or third opinion before you shell out hundreds of dollars on tires. Better safe than sorry.
    Looking to learn more about automotive care and/or a career in trucking? Advanced Career Institute would love to help. We are proud to serve California’s Central San Joaquin Valley. Check out our programs page to learn about our offerings!
  • the trucking industry outlook is positive and a great option for anyone looking for a new career

    What's Happening in the New Year for Trucking

    There are so many industries that fuel our economy. It's hard to track the outlook and trends for all of them. One industry that stands out as noteworthy for 2018 is the transportation sector, specifically the trucking industry. 2017 was a phenomenal year for heavy-duty trucks. All indications seem to point that the Trucking Industry Outlook for 2018 will be just as stellar. The current conditions for the trucking industry sure do seem to send an optimistic message that the transportation sector and trucking will continue to be robust and dynamic. The trucking industry has been and always will be the backbone of our nation's freight hauling and shipping. Without truckers hauling things from point A to point B, who would ensure goods, materials and commodities were moved out of warehouses and into homes, farms, and businesses? It's an invaluable area of our economy that everyone depends upon!

    What Will 2018 Offer?

    Today's truckers though are being looked at as far more than just bodies to get things moved. More and more companies today are really starting to focus on trucker comfort. They know that in order to keep good drivers happy and wanting to drive, they need to design trucks with enhancements that help induce contentment in one's work environment. It's not just comfort either, the rapid pace of new technology coming to play means better safety and automated diagnostic capabilities designed to keep existing drivers and attract new ones to the fold. Perhaps the efforts at all this modernization will indeed be a welcoming charm to the younger demographic. This group may not have considered pursuing a career in trucking until now. The contribution truckers make to our country is without a doubt one we cannot live without. But not everyone can just get behind a truck and take to the open road. It takes more than just your basic driver's license to be among the nation's finest and most in-demand professions today. Not everybody has the privilege of getting behind the wheel of a big rig. You need special training and a Commerical Driver's License which proves you have worked hard to learn what it takes to handle yourself and your truck on America's roads.

    How Can I Start?

    So, ask yourself, where are you heading and where are you going? Maybe it's time to consider what a career as a CDL driver could do for you and your future earnings. Contact us today for more information about pursuing a vocation in this well paid and respected industry. All of us at Advanced Career Insitute are ready to help get you started! We look forward to hearing from you!
  • ag transportation cdl training available at advanced career institute

    Bringing Healthy Foods from Farms to Your Table

    There are over 325 million people currently living in the United States, and each and every one of us requires safe and healthy food sources to lead a healthy life. Since we can't all live on farms to raise and grow our own sustenance, we rely on agriculture. America's farmers and ranchers are tasked with providing the reliable and safe foods that grace our supermarket aisles. Do you ever wonder how fresh vegetables appear at your local grocer in the midwest in winter? How meat is always stocked? Or how you can always manage to find strawberries in the northeast when temps are below zero? The answer? Agricultural Transport Drivers. Living in California, you're in luck! A large percentage of produce in the US comes from California due to the climate and lengthy growing seasons. So, we know where most of our food comes from, but how does it get from farm to store (and eventually your table)? For that, we can thank our Ag Transport Drivers. These drivers are the individuals who safely and efficiently transport agriculture products all over the country to make sure that we all have access to safe and healthy foods. Motorists see truck drivers all over America's highways, but may not be aware of the special training involved in the transport of agricultural products. Advanced Career Institute provides Ag Transportation CDL Training to students in California. Not only do students in this 20-week program receive education on all aspects of truck driving, they also receive instruction on the agriculture industry. Students will learn how to safely and properly transport agricultural products such as dairy, produce, equipment, and other agricultural commodities. Graduates of this program hold a Class A CDL and Agricultural Transportation Certification. They will also become an integral part of food security and the overall health and wellness of citizens across the country.

    Ready to Learn More?

    Advanced Career Institute is ready to get you started with your new career in trucking. If you feel Ag Transportation is the next step for you, we would love to talk with you more! Our Admissions Team is ready to help answer any of your questions.
  • jar full of coins

    Keeping Finances Organized While on the Road

    Managing finances can seem overwhelming when you are away from home. Staying organized does not have to be a source of additional stress. There are several ways to manage your money better while still on the move. Here are a few tips to start the New Year off strong by staying organized with your finances.

    Make a List

    In order to manage money well, you have to know how much is coming in versus how much is going out. Take the time to create a list that includes the date each bill is due, the date deposits are made, and any expenses for food, clothing, or other necessities.

    Bank Better

    Not all banks are created equal, and for that reason, it is important to do research and choose one that meets your individual needs. Choose a bank or a credit union that offers free checking services, low ATM fees, and mobile banking options so you can track and manage your account from anywhere. A good bank should also have no minimum balance requirements or limit the number of transactions you can make. Since you will likely be away from home, banks with a great Mobile App will be especially beneficial.

    Consolidate

    If you have multiple checking, savings, or credit card accounts, now is the time to consider consolidating. Having multiple accounts only makes it harder to keep track of what you owe, when it was paid, and through which account. As a bonus, this can also save you money. You can choose to keep the accounts with the lowest fees and interest rates.

    Take Advantage of Technology

    Free apps, like Mint and Prism, are available and make staying organized a breeze. You can keep all of your financial information in one place and can access it from your mobile device. Not only can you pay bills through these apps, but also get notifications and reminders for any bill that is not set up on auto-pay. Taking the time to manage your money better is a great resolution. Knowing you are organized will give you that peace of mind while on the road. It might just save you some money as well! At Advanced Career Institute, we are proud to offer training in the transportation and welding industry. If you're ready to make 2018 a great year, contact us for more more information.
  • Worknet logo with 12 cdl training scholarships

    Advanced Career Institute Teams Up with Werner Enterprises

    Advanced Career Institute, Central Valley’s largest and only nationally accredited truck driver training program, will be doing a special Class A CDL training program for some lucky residents of Merced County in California.  There are 12 initial Scholarships available for a 4-week program to qualified residents. “Here in the Merced area, there are a lot of people looking for a better paying and long-term career.  So, we thought it would be a great idea to introduce the folks at Werner Enterprises to Worknet.  Werner has great paying jobs.  And Worknet has people that are looking for a new and different opportunity”, said Everett Yockey, ACI Merced Campus Director. WHAT CAN YOU EARN? New truck drivers with their Class A CDL at Werner Enterprises can earn up to $48,000 the first year.  In your 2nd year, you can expect to earn $55,000 - $65,000 as an experienced driver!  So, Advanced Career Institute in Merced created an accelerated, local CDL truck driver training program for individuals to help make this happen.  ACI gets you trained and ready to start work for Werner in just 4 weeks.  “This is a really a great program!  We are helping people get the training they need to be successful in the trucking industry.  Worknet and Werner Enterprises are teaming up to offer an incredible scholarship program to help cover the costs for the student”, said ACI President, David Bither.  You will leave ACI prepared to take your DMV Permit Test because you will be receiving 160 hours of truck driver training. This new program is currently being taught at the ACI Merced Campus and spots are going fast.  Learn more about this CDL Training Scholarship program by contacting our Merced campus today at 1 (209) 437-3767.  The Admissions Staff will help get you started and review all the details with you.
  • Women in the trucking industry

    Commercial truck driving is a historically male-dominated industry, with women comprising only 5.1% of today's truck-driving workforce. It's a tough job, requiring extensive CDL training, finely-honed skills, and physical strength. But as history shows, women who are determined to succeed in this industry are unstoppable. Truck-driving Women Who Made History
    • Luella Bates (1897-1985) - During a time when women were expected to be homemakers, Luella refused to be restrained by tradition. She joined the labor force during WWI, driving trucks for Four Wheel Drive Auto Company in Wisconsin. After the war most women were fired, but Luella was so good at her job that she remained employed as a driver. She was also charismatic, using spectacle to promote Four Wheel Drive's line of commercial and fire trucks. This bold pioneer paved the way for other women by achieving mastery in a field previously thought to be the exclusive domain of men.
    • Lillie Elizabeth McGee Drennan (1897-1974) - Known for her signature ten-gallon hat, loaded revolver, and tendency to curse, Lillie was truly a force to be reckoned with. She owned and ran the Drennan Truck Line, and in 1929 she became the first woman to be granted a CDL after successfully suing the Railroad Commission for "sex bias." This lawsuit set the legal precedent against sexual discrimination in the trucking industry.
    • Adriesue "Bitsy" Gomez (1943-2015) - Described as a "gear-jamming gal with white-line fever," Bitsy founded the Coalition of Women Truck Drivers. Using their influence and the courts, they challenged the sexist practices and attitudes pervasive in the truck driving industry at the time, and encouraged more women to take on CDL training.
    Industry Changes
    • Recruiting more women - Thanks to pioneers like Luella, Lillie, and Bitsy, modern trucking companies are making big changes to attract female drivers. Carriers are offering more practice time in truck driving simulators, female driver liasons, internal support groups, and classes on sexual harassment awareness and self-defense.
    • Support Networks - Organizations such as Women In Trucking and REAL Women in Trucking, Inc provide support, job listings, and the opportunity to connect with other female truck drivers.
    • Female-friendly trucks - Ryder System Inc. has redesigned their cabs to be more ergonomic or women, with adjusted seat height and more accessible placement of handles and gauges.
    The trucking industry still has a long way to go to achieve gender equality, but thanks to bold, capable women past and present, the future looks bright. For every woman who obtains her Class A CDL, another will be inspired to enroll in truck driver training. To sign up for the Advanced Career Institute California Truck Driving School Programcontact us today!