Welding

Helpful Information About Potential Welding Careers

  • Which Welding Career Path is Best for You?

    People who get into welding are those who love to work with their hands and are not afraid to get dirty while doing it. Welders take pride in their job and want to do their best at every project they take on. When started a career in welding, are a variety of job options for those who have completed their degree and are looking for work. The following are seven welding careers you may not have thought of:

    Assemblers and Fabricators:

    These individuals work to put the finishing touches on a variety of consumer goods that we purchase in our daily lives. They use their welding skills to help finish making items such as toys, electronic devices, and computers. Assemblers and Fabricators also work on other vital pieces of our country's infrastructure such as modes of transportation. They help build forms of transportation such as aircraft, ships, and boats.

    Boilermakers:

    Boilermakers produce steel fabrications such from plates and tubes. Originally, boilermakers created boilers, although today they develop a variety of different technologies including bridges, blast makers, and other mining equipment. Many of these welders travel to the worksite to do their work. This line of work may mean some regional or national traveling to perform their welding on the structures that need to be worked on.

    Jeweler, Precious Stone, and Metal Workers:

    Many welders that work in the jewelry field spend their days at a small bench hunched over a specific piece of jewelry that they are working to repair. Most jewelry that they work on will be higher-cost pieces that include precious stones and metals such as gold. The goal is to get the piece close to original condition as possible to get the value of the piece as high as possible.

    Machinists, Tool, and Die Makers:

    These welders work on welding pieces of machines or tools that get used in a variety of different fields including transportation (i.e., automobiles, trucks, buses, aircraft, planes, or boats) or the construction industry (such as welding and finishing off construction tools). This sect of welders often has to work nights and weekends to get their jobs completed on a strict timeline for other automotive or construction projects to be able to move forward on their set schedules.

    Sheet Metal Workers:

    Sheet Metal Workers are welders who are responsible for welding sheets of metal together to create finished products. Most sheet metal workers work to generate heating and air conditioning systems which require these sheets of metal to be welded together to produce these units for both commercial and residential buildings. Sheet metal will often get heavy, and the structures that these welders work on become very sizable. Heavy lifting and moving large, finished pieces of work are all part of the job.

    Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters:

    These welders work primarily in the construction industry to help work on building projects that are still getting completed. They often work on plumbing and pipefitting in both commercial and residential buildings. Their jobs are to ensure that the plumbing, piping, and ductwork in buildings is up to the building code and safety standards outlined in that area. These workers will have to travel to the construction site to perform their work. Deadlines are also standard in this field of welding as the plumbing and pipefitting must get finished before the next phase of construction can begin.

    Metal and Plastic Machine Workers:

    Metal and Plastic Machine Workers are welders who set up and operate machines that are responsible for cutting, shaping and producing both metal and plastic pieces that get used in the construction of a variety of goods that get created in our modern, consumer society. These products are often required to get built to certain safety standards set forth by the industry for which the product is getting designed.   There is a variety of options for welders when it comes to choosing a long-term career. Dream big and find a career that fits your desires and needs as a welder! In the end, it will make work a pleasure, and not a chore as the options in the welding field are genuinely endless. For further information on Advanced Career Institute's Welding Training, contact us today!
    *This blog was originally written in 2016 and has been updated according to industry standards.
  • What the Future Holds for Welders

    As we head into a new year, many experts are turning their attention to what one can expect from the welding industry as we move into 2019. Overall, the industry experts weighing in say that the upcoming year looks quite bright for those who are interested in training to become welders. Consumer demand is increasing at a modest rate and that means that the demand for welders will continue to grow. Pay and compensation have stayed quite high and the standard of living a welder can have is relatively competitive with many other professions of today.

    A Look Into Welding's Future: 2019 and Beyond

    As we ring in 2019, welders are making a median entry-level wage of about $40,000+ per year which averages out to about $19-20 per hour. The field is also accessible to most Americans as the requirements to begin the work is either a high school diploma or GED. Most welding jobs do not have previous work or experience requirements in order to be qualified to begin the job. As of 2016, there are about 404,800 welders working throughout the US. In 2019, the field is expected to grow at a steady rate of about 6%. This is about the average growth rates for most occupations in the US right now. That rate is anticipated to set the pace until at least 2026, which is for the foreseeable future. Ultimately, this means that the welding industry will add about 22,500 jobs between the years 2016 and 2026.

    How Do I Get Into Welding As a Career?

    Most welding programs, such as the one offered by the Advanced Career Institute, accept applicants directly out of high school or those who have received their GED (or equivalent) to apply to our program. Most programs can be completed within about 9 months from their start date and there are no previous requirements for experience in welding to be accepted into our program. Students who complete the ACI Welding Training program are able to meet the qualifications to join the American Welding Society (AWS). The AWS sets the standards for training for welders entering the industry and seeking employment in the welding field. ACI's program will qualify students for a variety of positions including horizontal, vertical, overhead, & 6G positions. This will prepare workers for a career in a variety of different areas of welding including welding for the purposes of agriculture, construction, structural metals manufacturing, machinery equipment repair/maintenance, and commercial purposes, just to name a few fields that students will be eligible to get work in.

    A Positive Outlook

    As the industry continues to grow at a modest rate, coming to the Advanced Career Institute can give students a head start to a great new career. Through Welding Training, students will earn their certification to join the American Welding Society (AWS) and get started in this lucrative field. Welding comes with competitive pay and full benefits. For more information on getting your American Welding Society (AWS) certification so that you can get a job in this excited, growing field, feel free to contact us Advanced Career Institute for further assistance!
  • Comparing Great Welders Among the Rest

    Great welders have several things in common. These are some of the traits, qualities, characteristics, and skills that separate the great welders from the "good enough." Here are just a few that ACI feels stands above the others in determining great welders among others.

    Highly Trained

    The greatest welders attended premier welding schools like Advanced Career Institute in California. They receive the core theory, training and hands-on welding time necessary to pass the various American Welding Society tests and performance qualifications.

    Students of the Craft

    This means they applied and dedicated themselves to the diligent study, learning and practice of welding.

    Grounded in the Fundamentals

    You must know the basics of welding inside and out. A firm foundation in the fundamentals provide the stair steps needed to achieve the skill levels common in great welders. There's a reason algebra is not your first math course.

    Informed About the Industry

    Highly sought after welders keep up to date on the latest industry changes and regulations, especially safety.

    Subject Matter Experts

    Being the subject matter expert not only means you know about a great deal about welding. It also means you never stop learning.

    Superb Manual Dexterity

    Better known as "great hands" are common to "great welders." Hand skills and coordination are developed through proper training in technique and practice, practice, practice.

    Self-Motivation

    Welders often work alone. They are assigned a task or handed a set of blueprints and sent to accomplish the job. The self-motivated welder figures out the most efficient way to get the job done.   5 of the 7 characteristics for "great welders" are rooted in the school students attend and the training that school provides. It's evident that those who want to be superior welders need good training. Cutting edge training helps you achieve the skills common to the best welders in the industry. Advanced Career Institute welcomes and invites you to contact us to discuss your future.
  • Common Questions to Debunk

    Whether you're looking into a welding training program, or coming to the completion of your current welding training program, you might be wondering what to expect in your first year as a welder. Your first year after welder training is full of opportunities, decisions, and questions. These are the four most common questions welders have during their first year on the job:

    1. What certification do I need as a welder?

    The American Welding Society (AWS) provides welder performance tests as a way to let your future employers know that you are qualified for the job at hand. If you're attending California's Advanced Career Institute, along with receiving a Certificate of Completion, you will be provided the opportunity to take multiple AWS tests.

    2. What will I be paid as an entry-level welder?

    In California, entry-level welders can earn between 16 and 25 dollars an hour, which amounts to a base pay of 32,000 to 50,000 dollars a year before benefits and bonuses. Keep in mind, some industries pay welders more than others. For example, in some situations, underwater welders can be paid over a thousand dollars a day for their time and labor. This however, does require additional training and education.

    3. What are my job opportunities as an entry-level welder?

    As a welder, your job opportunities are nearly endless. Almost every industry has the need for welders and the skills they bring. You can work with construction, shipbuilding, aerospace engineering, automobile manufacturing, pipelines, computers and advanced technology, medical devices, etc. With enough experience, passion, and education, you can even work as a welding teacher!

    4. Do I need further training or an apprenticeship?

    The need for further training is completely dependent on your goals within your field. After completing the program at Advanced Career Institute, you will be fully prepared to take your qualification exams and enter the field of welding as an entry-level welder. While on the job, you may see things that you'd like to better understand. You may also work firsthand with engineers who spark your interest in engineering. To better understand what you're working with, or even to further your education to become an engineer, you will need more education and training. Normally, a welder training program replaces the need for an apprenticeship, but in certain specialized fields, like underwater welding, you may be asked to start as an apprentice so as to learn while on the job.   Your first year as a welder will be full of on the job learning and exciting growth opportunities. If you have any questions regarding the welder training program, please feel free to contact the Advanced Career Institute. ACI is excited to help get you started with your Welding Training at 3 of our campus locations; Fresno, Visalia, and Bakersfield.
  • Advanced Career Institute Opens School in Bakersfield

    Bakersfield, CA – Advanced Career Institute would like to announce their newest location in Bakersfield, California. Their new school is located at 2925 Mosasco St. Unit B, Bakersfield, CA 93312, the former John Lopez Welding School. ACI had their first welding class start on Wednesday, July 24, 2018. President of Advanced Career Institute, Barry Bither said, “It is with great excitement that I am able to announce we opened with our first welding class in Bakersfield… All of our staff has done a great job getting the new campus off to a great start. We have completed the purchase of John Lopez Welding School and wish John all the best in his retirement. In the next few weeks, we will be diligently working on adding all of our truck driving programs to the new campus. Please welcome the new employees we are adding to the ACI family.” The new Bakersfield Campus will have both Welding and CDL Training. The Welding Training will consist of the Advanced Welding Technology Program that lasts 38-weeks and a new Basic Plate Welding Program that will last 5-weeks. The CDL Training programs at the Bakersfield Campus will consist of their Professional Truck Driver Program, lasting 4-weeks, and the more advanced Agriculture Transportation Training Course lasting 20-weeks. The first transportation class start date will be August 13, 2018. Like all ACI Campuses, Bakersfield students will gain the quality education and training needed to start a new career. Advanced Career Institute programs combine both hands-on experience and in-class technical training. ACI offers financial aid to those who qualify. The Admissions staff will work with every student to determine their eligibility, and then help them apply for financial aid. The Career Services staff will provide students with the tools that are necessary to find employment, which includes helping them search and apply for current job openings. All staff and instructors at Advanced Career Institute are excited about this new school opening in Bakersfield and the potential to help new students begin their careers in trucking and welding. For more information about our Bakersfield Campus and the training programs provided, call us at 661-535-1480.  
  • Common Questions Asked By New Welding Students

    New welding students often have a lot of questions. These questions can range anywhere from work prospects and equipment, to history. Below are a few of the most common questions our instructors receive:

    1: Where do welders work?

    • Welders can work in a variety of industries, including construction, shipbuilding, industrial maintenance, repair, and manufacturing.

    2: What skills are most important for a welder?

    • A good welder should not only be well versed in the theory and practice of the different welding applications, but should also have strong problem-solving skills, the ability to read plans and blueprints, and have strong communication skills.

    3: Is there really a difference between cheaper and more expensive auto-darkening helmets?

    • Personal Protective Equipment, or PPE, is your first line of defense in keeping yourself safe. It is important to read ratings on products before purchase. Spending a bit more may get you a more comfortable and longer lasting helmet.

    4: What are the most common types of welding used for?

    • Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW): This type of stick welding is most commonly used in industrial fabrication applications to weld iron and steel, fabricate steel structures, and can be used in the shop or in the field.
    • Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW/MIG): This is the most common type of industrial welding, and is a bit faster than SMAW because of the continuous electrode wire feed. This application can also be used in the shop or in the field for fabrication.
    • Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW): FCAW is most commonly used in portable applications to weld thick and out of position metals.
    • Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW/TIG): TIG welding is most commonly used to weld thin sections of stainless steel and copper, aluminum or magnesium alloys.

    5: When was welding first used?

    • The first historical evidence of a welding process dates back to the Bronze Age. During this time there is evidence of pressure welding being used to create small gold boxes. Later on, people in Egypt and Mediterranean learned how to weld pieces of iron together to make tools.
    At Advanced Career Institute, students gain the quality education and training needed to start a new career. Our Welding Program combines both hands-on experience and in-class technical training for California truck driving, commercial and school bus driving, and welding. We have three campuses located throughout California's Central San Joaquin Valley in Fresno, Visalia, and Merced, California. If you are interested in a career in welding or learning more about our programs, please contact us.
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